Category Archives: Collaboration

Reminder: CFP – Minimal Computing Group Kickstart

The GO::DH Minimal Computing Working Group will kickstart itself at DH2014 with a workshop.  A key component of this workshop is a series of lightning talks (2-5 minute presentations) on current work going on in the area from around the globe.  The deadline for submissions is May 1. As CFPs go the requirements are pretty light: just a single page on what you have been up to regarding minimal computing, whether it be working with hardware, software, theory, or any combination thereof.  We even have provisions being put in place to include those who would like to participate but who will not be in Switzerland for DH2014. We can take up to 30 submissions for the workshop and expect that all submissions will be included in a bundled PDF file that will be circulated to the DH community and made available on the working group web page. Sound great but just finding out about this now?  Need a little more time?  Send workshop organizer John Simpson a note at john.simpson@ualberta.ca and we'll happily work out a short extension with you. CHECK OUT THE FULL CFP AT http://www.globaloutlookdh.org/working-groups/minimal-computing/kickstart-workshop/

The Global Women Wikipedia Write-In by The Rewriting Wikipedia Project: April 26, 2013, 1-3pm EST

by Adeline Koh and Roopika Risam

rewritewikipedia

As part of the Rewriting Wikipedia Project, we will be hosting the Global Women Write-In (#GWWI) virtually on April 26, 2013 from 1-3pm EST. This globally oriented project  encourages editors to add more entries and information on women around the world to Wikipedia, since entries on individuals from these groups are often missing or neglected.

While Wikipedia has increasingly taken on the role of most commonly referenced encyclopedia, the number and length of entries on ethnic/minority and marginalized people around the world are lacking. This is arguably the result of the internalized biases and interests of most Wikipedia editors. According to the Wikimedia Wikipedia’s Editor’s Survey of 2011, “If there is a typical Wikipedia editor, he has a college degree, is 30-years-old, is computer savvy but not necessarily a programmer, doesn’t actually spend much time playing games, and lives in US or Europe.” As a result, we also aim to encourage new people to become Wikipedia editors to diversify the profile of Wikipedia editors, and we provide support for these editors and develop best practices for rewriting Wikipedia.

The Rewriting Wikipedia Project is a working group within GO:DH that works in conjunction with the Postcolonial Digital Humanities (#dhpoco) movement to increase the number of and improve existing entries on marginalized peoples and cultures. The Rewriting Wikipedia Project argues that editing Wikipedia is one of the most important projects for global activists because Wikipedia is a commonly referenced source of information riddled with incomplete or missing entries on people from marginalized groups. Yet, anyone can edit Wikipedia, so this openness represents tremendous opportunity to help shape global forms of knowledge.

The write-in will be the first of a series of events sponsored by the Rewriting Wikipedia Project addressing inequalities in Wikipedia, and it builds on the success of the #TooFEW Feminists Engage Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon in March.

How can you participate?

  1. Contribute to the list of  Wikipedia entries that we should edit or improve. Add your ideas to the working list here, or in the comments below. You can find 'stub' articles -- those that have been marked as needing further information - by searching various categories.

  2. Sign up for a Wikipedia account (we recommend using a pseudonym).

  3. Watch this video to learn just how to edit Wikipedia. Be sure to set aside some time for this video. It’s an hour long, and we recommend clicking on FLASH – it tends to play better that way. If you don’t have time to do this, join the hashtag on Twitter or our designated chatroom.

  4. Review our resources for writing Wikipedia entries that stick and our useful links.

  5. Don't want to write? Add images to feminist articles. Here is the image use policy for Wikipedia.

  6. Track our work and tweet your own using the hashtag #GWWI.

  7. Join us on Friday, April 26th from your own computer!

Expand the Project

  • Teachers – Do your students need extra credit? Can Rewriting Wikipedia become a class project?

  • Students – Are you learning about some really cool people in POC/Trans*/Queer/Women’s History who don’t have wiki pages or have pages with incorrect information? You can fix that!

  • Friends – Do you know other folks who should know about our work? Please send this link to activists, faculty or others who might be interested in participating. Everyone is welcome!

  • Organizations – Do you know organizations that have information on different communities, histories, or projects that should be added to Wikipedia?

  • Too swamped to edit right now but want to contribute? Add your idea to our list.

Additional Resources

** Credits go to Jacqueline Wernimont and Moya Bailey, Fiona Barnett and Amanda Starling Gould for some of the copy above.

**Wikipedia image remixed from original image from Octavio Rojas on Flickr. Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License

How to Create a Working Group

Perhaps you have noticed that GO::DH has several working groups or perhaps you have not yet explored this part of our site. Whether you already belong to a working group or whether you are thinking of creating one, here are some things you should know about them. A working group is a group of individuals with a common task or interest and who would like to work with others sharing the same concerns. You might already know that you want to start a working group or you might be thinking that it would be good to have a place to discuss a particular subject. If you have been wondering about this, if you have had discussions in the GO::DH mailing list, if you think that others are also interested, you could start your own working group. GO::DH provides working groups with a space for a webpage, a mailing list pertaining to the group and guidance when you need it. If you decide to create a working group, you must have a group coordinator, a page in GO::DH outlining the interest(s) of the group and the coordinator must report the group’s progress to the GO::DH  executive once a month. If you think that you want to do this, send us a message and we will help you get things started.

Translation Commons

The Translation Commons is a new GO::DH working group that aims to encourage multilingual collaboration. If you see something on the GO::DH website that you’d like to translate, you can fill out the contact form on the working group page and check the box to register as a translator or translation team. Feel free to translate as much or as little as you’d like!